25.9 KnitR Basic Example

20200602 Our first example of running actual R code will generate some random uniform data using stats::runif() and then viewing the utils::head() of the data and calculating the BiocGenerics::mean(). The following code block shows how this will look in the source .Rnw file.

<<example_random_mean>>=
# Always include a short comment to support the code.

x <- runif(1000) * 1000
head(x)
mean(x)
@

Below is what it looks like after it is processed by knitr (Xie 2021) and then LaTeX (as happens when we click the Compile PDF button in RStudio).

# Always include a short comment to support the code.

x <- runif(1000) * 1000
head(x)
## [1] 262.3686 965.5400 111.5994 230.4745 266.6265 835.7733
mean(x)
## [1] 500.1816

Notice that the syntax is colour highlighted and the output is included as comments introduced in R with the ##. If we were to evaluate these commands ourselves in R the the output would not include the ##.

References

———. 2021. Knitr: A General-Purpose Package for Dynamic Report Generation in r. https://yihui.org/knitr/.


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